Design


The materials that go into an instrument will determine its quality and the way it sounds. Hoffmann Lutherie uses both high quality domestic and tropical woods from renewable sources. Whenever possible, the wood begins as a saw log that is quarter sawn and air dried for at least 3 years. Going as close to the source of the wood as possible insures that it can be processed in the best way possible before being selected for a new instrument.

Improving the structure goes a long way in improving the sound and longevity of an instrument. Materials used for necks, bracing, tops and backs are selected and processed with their individual purpose in mind. All the parts that go into Hoffmann ukuleles are designed to have the right amount of structural integrety where needed.

materials

The pinned nut is a Hoffmann exclusive. Borrowed from a method in which pianos are strung, they eliminate problems associated with grooved nuts. A properly groove nut is good only for the strings that fit in the grooves. If heavier guage strings are used, they might not fit in the slot, and lighter guage strings might tend to buzz. Pinned nuts will accommodate any diameter while keeping strings aligned as well as grooved nuts. .

Style is as important as all the other aspects of an instrument. It must follow function, but in doing so, it can become an element all its own. As long as all the other requirements that relate to sound and durability are met, style can go beyond the contraints of traditional shapes and become something new.

materials

Keeping ahead of the design curve when it comes to finding better ways to do things must be a constant indeavor. In this example, the saddle takes the string load and is catilevered in a slot that goes into the body. This makes it possible to add two small adjustment screws that determine how high the saddle is when in place under load.

"I enjoyed visiting your shop and buying my ukulele from the craftsman who made it. That doesn't happen very often these days. I am quickly adjusting to the diminutive instrument and I continue to be impressed with the tone, action & build quality. The fun factor alone is worth the price! My guitar now feels huge & I find myself reaching for the uke when I'm feeling musical. The music world needs more artisans & fewer mass-producers. Thanks for doing your part so well! -David Lowry